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Ez-Bar Preacher Curl 101 Video Tutorial

Gym Main Variation Strength

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Ez-Bar Preacher Curl
Ez-Bar Preacher Curl

Exercise Synopsis

Target Muscle Group

Biceps

Secondary Targets

Execution

Isolation

Force Type

Pull

Required Equipment

Barbell

Fitness Level

Intermediate

Alternatives

None

Timer

Hour

Minute

Second

Stopwatch

00:00:00:00

Overview

The Ez-Bar Preacher Curl is a bicep-centric strength-training exercise that specifically targets the muscles of the arms. Utilizing an Ez-Bar, individuals perform this exercise on a preacher bench, which provides support for the upper arms, isolating the biceps during the movement. With palms facing upwards, the Ez-Bar is gripped at shoulder-width, and the individual curls the bar towards the chest in a controlled motion. The preacher bench ensures strict form by eliminating momentum, placing heightened emphasis on the biceps. As a secondary target, the triceps also receive engagement during the eccentric phase of the exercise. Incorporating the Ez-Bar Preacher Curl into a workout routine helps enhance bicep development, promotes muscular balance, and is a valuable addition to comprehensive upper arm strength training.

How to Perform

  1. Set up for the Ez-Bar Preacher Curl by adjusting the preacher bench seat to ensure your upper arms rest comfortably on the padding when seated.

  2. Load the desired weight onto the barbell, ensuring it is securely in place before beginning the exercise.

  3. Sit on the preacher bench and grab the Ez-Bar with an underhand grip, hands positioned shoulder-width apart. Note that you have the flexibility to choose between a wide or narrow grip, allowing for variation in bicep muscle engagement.

  4. With a straight back and eyes facing forward, lift the weight off the rack, supporting it with your arms slightly bent. This marks the starting position, emphasizing the importance of maintaining proper posture throughout the exercise.

  5. Execute a controlled movement, bringing the weight up until your forearms form a right angle with the floor. This action ensures optimal activation of the biceps.

  6. At the top of the movement, squeeze the biceps to enhance muscle contraction before slowly lowering the weight back to the starting position.

  7. Repeat the Ez-Bar Preacher Curl for the desired number of repetitions, emphasizing a smooth and deliberate motion to effectively target the biceps while also engaging the triceps as secondary muscles.

Tips

  1. Maintain a deliberate and controlled pace during the Ez-Bar Preacher Curl, emphasizing slow and controlled motions to optimize muscle engagement and prevent unnecessary strain.

  2. Avoid pausing or "resting" at the top of the movement; instead, maintain continuous tension on the biceps throughout the set for sustained muscle activation.

  3. Enhance the effectiveness of the exercise by squeezing the biceps vigorously at the top of the movement. This peak contraction not only maximizes muscle engagement but also contributes to overall bicep development.

  4. Experiment with grip variations to target different areas of the biceps: utilize a wide grip to emphasize the inner biceps and a close grip to specifically engage the outer biceps. This strategic variation contributes to a comprehensive bicep workout and promotes balanced muscle development.

How Not to Perform

  1. Avoid Excessive Body Momentum:

    Refrain from using excessive body momentum to lift the barbell during the Ez-Bar Preacher Curl. Over-reliance on body movement can compromise the isolation of the biceps and lead to ineffective muscle engagement.

  2. Steer Clear of Arching the Back:

    Avoid arching your back excessively during the exercise. Maintain a stable and neutral spine position to prevent strain on the lower back and ensure that the biceps, rather than the back muscles, are the primary focus.

  3. Do Not Rush the Repetitions:

    Prevent rushing through the repetitions. Performing the Ez-Bar Preacher Curl too quickly not only diminishes the effectiveness of the exercise but also increases the risk of injuries. Emphasize a slow and controlled pace for each repetition.

  4. Refrain from Using Excessive Weight:

    Steer clear of using weights that are too heavy for proper form. Employing excessive weight can compromise your ability to maintain control, leading to potential injuries and detracting from the targeted bicep and tricep engagement.

  5. Avoid Gripping Too Narrow or Too Wide:

    Refrain from using an excessively narrow or wide grip on the Ez-Bar. Optimal grip width ensures effective targeting of the biceps and triceps. Experiment with grip variations within a comfortable range to find what works best for your individual biomechanics.

  6. Do Not Neglect Full Range of Motion:

    Prevent neglecting the full range of motion during the Ez-Bar Preacher Curl. Ensure that the barbell is lifted until the biceps are fully contracted and lower it back down in a controlled manner. Incomplete range of motion may limit muscle activation.

  7. Refrain from Swinging the Elbows:

    Avoid swinging the elbows excessively during the upward phase of the curl. Maintain a stable elbow position to isolate the biceps and prevent unnecessary stress on the joints.

  8. Do Not Sacrifice Form for Repetitions:

    Steer clear of sacrificing proper form for the sake of completing more repetitions. Focus on quality over quantity to ensure optimal muscle engagement and reduce the risk of injury.

Variations

Variations of fitness exercises refer to different ways of performing a specific exercise or movement to target various muscle groups, intensities, or goals. These variations aim to challenge the body differently, prevent plateaus, and cater to individuals with varying fitness levels.

EQUIPMENT

Barbell

EXECUTION

Compound

FITNESS LEVEL

Intermediate

Alternatives

Alternative exercises in fitness refer to different movements or activities that target similar muscle groups or serve the same training purpose as the primary exercise. These alternative exercises can be used as substitutes when the original exercise is unavailable or challenging to perform due to various reasons such as equipment limitations, injuries, or personal preferences.